Jason Andrew is the founding partner of Artist Estate Studio which manages the careers of Jack Tworkov (1900-1982) and Elizabeth Murray (1940-2007) among  others. He has presented regularly at BMCM+AC Conferences including papers on Ruth Asawa, John Cage, Katherine Litz, and Jack Tworkov.  

Dr. Sandra Ballard is a professor of English at Appalachian State University. Ballard joined the English Department faculty and the Center for Appalachian Studies in 2000 as the editor of Appalachian Journal. She is the co-editor of  Listen Here: Women Writing in Appalachia  and  The Collected Short Stories of Harriette Simpson  Arnow.

Dr. Joseph Bathanti is a professor of Creative Writing at Appalachian State University and the University’s Watauga Residential College Writer-in-Residence. Bathanti is the former Poet Laureate of North Carolina (2012-14) and recipient of the 2016 North Carolina Award for Literature.

Jay Bonner is the Associate Head of School and Humanities teacher at the Asheville School. Bonner received his Master’s of Arts degree in Creative Writing from Brown University.

Jacob Brault is an artist working in Asheville, NC. Brault  received  his MFA in Sculpture from the University of Georgia in 2014 and has been teaching Sculpture and Installation at Warren Wilson College since 2015. 

Tyondai Braxton is a composer and electronic musician. He was the former front man of the experimental rock group Battles. In collaboration with artist Uffe Surland Van Tams, Braxton premiered HIVE, a multimedia sculptural and electronic project at The Guggenheim Museum in New York City in 2013.

Candace Buck completed her MLAS degree in 2016, focusing on creative writing with  the history of Black Mountain College woven into her final projects. Buck currently lives in Asheville and works for the Administration and Finance Department at UNC Asheville.

Dianna  Cameron has been the Curator of Exhibitions & Collections Director at the  Blowing Rock Art and History  Museum (BRAHM) since July 2014. Cameron coordinated the exhibition Arts at the Center: A History of Black Mountain College at BRAHM in Spring 2018.

Julie Levin Caro is a Professor of Art History at Warren Wilson College. A specialist in modern American art and African American art, Caro received her doctorate in art history from the University of Texas at Austin. Her current exhibition project is Between Form and Content: Perspectives on Jacob Lawrence and Black Mountain College. 

Zoe Chaplin is a sophomore and Management Major at Appalachian State University. Chaplin is from Charlotte, NC.

Eric “Rodent” Cheslak is an Asheville-based photographer, musician, composer and co-founder of Modular on the Spot performance series – an outdoor event that provides modular synthesizer enthusiasts the space to share and perform music in an inclusive environment, free of cost.

Curt Cloninger  is an artist, writer, and Associate Professor of New Media at the UNC Asheville. He has published on a wide range of topics, including new media and internet art, installation and performance art, experimental graphic design, popular music, and network culture. 

Marcia R. Cohen, artist and educator, is known for her artwork and scholarship in color theory. Cohen has presented at national and international conferences dedicated to the interdisciplinary dimension of color topics. Her art work explores color and perception across all media including painting, sculpture, photography and site-based installation work. 

Martha Colburn attended the Maryland Institute College of Art and Design in Baltimore where she released 6 records, made 5,000 record covers and over 40 super 8mm and 16mm films. Colburn began producing multimedia art installations and visual art shows to accompany her films during an artist residency at Rijksakademie (Royal Academy of Arts) in 2000.

Charles Darwent is an art critic and reviewer. He contributes regularly to the Guardian, the Art Newspaper and ArtReview. His publications include The Drawing Book: A Survey of Drawing, Mondrian in London, and Josef Albers: Life and Work.

Jeff Davis attended UNC-Greensboro’s MFA program in creative writing, and studied with Robert Creeley at the State University of New York at Buffalo. His poems have appeared in Lillabulero, Iron, Asheville Poetry Review, Nantahala Review, Kakalak Anthology, and other periodicals. Davis hosts the radio program Wordplay, which features poets and writers of creative prose via AshevilleFM.org.  

Kate Dempsey Martineau earned her Ph.D. from the University of Texas. An independent scholar, she explores the intersecting art and political climates of the 1950s and 1960s as well as the complex relationships within the burgeoning New York art world.

Susan Lowell de Solórzano has an MA in Human Development & Education with a focus on kinesthetic learning. Solorzano has been assistant to Dr. Stephen M Levin since 2012 and co-authored “The significance of closed kinematic chains to biological movement and dynamic stability.”

Lauren Di Monte is the Data and Research Impact Librarian at the University of Rochester where she works to engage and support faculty in interdisciplinary research. In 2017, she founded the library’s Tinker Space with workshops on diverse topics including: creative coding with microcontrollers, basic electronics skills like soldering, and data science skills like data visualization and creative coding projects.  

Alvis Dunn is an assistant professor of history at UNC Asheville. His major field of study and research is Latin America, most specifically Guatemala. First and foremost a colonialist, his work also often encompasses the stories of travelers to Guatemala. His most recent publication is entitled, “Six Months in Central America: The Journal of Confederate General Pierce M.B. Young, United States Minister Plenipotentiary to Guatemala and Honduras in 1895.” 

Ann Dunn has served as a member of the Humanities faculty at UNC Asheville since 1996. She graduated from Indiana University-South Bend in 1972, received her Master’s Degree from UNC-Asheville in 1992, and her Ph.D. program concentration at USC in Shakespearian Studies with a secondary focus on the Literature of the Italian Renaissance.

Walker Farrell is a composer and educator of electronic music, teaching beginners’ workshops for the Make Noise 0-Coast synthesizer. In 2017, Farrell gave a presentation at BMCAC on the history of tape music and microsound, and took part in the John Cage Room at ReHappening 2018.

Grayson Fields is a junior at Appalachian State University studying Interdisciplinary Studies Major. Grayson is from Greensboro, NC.  

Abby Frye is a junior at Appalachian State University and an Interdisciplinary Studies Major. Frye is from Irmo, SC. 

Jeff Gardiner received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa; he wrote his dissertation on Charles Olson under the guidance of Sherman Paul. In addition to his essays and talks on Olson, he has taught a course on Olson’s poetics at the Ruth Asawa School of the Arts in San Francisco.

Shana Dumont Garr is the Curator of Fruitlands Museum in Harvard, MA. She oversees the exhibitions and the permanent collection. She holds a MA in Art History from Boston University and a BA in Art History and Creative Writing from Colby College in Waterville, ME.

Lyman Grant is a poet and writer of four collections including  Old Men  on  Tuesday Mornings  and many edited volumes of short stories, served as Dean of Humanities at Austin City College, and is now retired in Virginia.

Dr. Tom Hansell is an Assistant Professor of Appalachian Studies and co-director of University Documentary Services. Hansell has worked in the academic and nonprofit worlds for twenty years as a documentary filmmaker in Appalachia. He is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships and has served on panels for the National Endowment for the Arts.

Dr. Leslie King-Hammond is an artist, curator, and art historian. She is the Founding Director of the Center for Race and Culture at the Maryland Institute of College Art, where she is also Graduate Dean Emeritus. 

Mary Emma Harris is an independent scholar and serves as the Chair and Director of the Black Mountain Project. Harris was named the 2016 Black Mountain College Legacy Research Scholar at UNC Asheville. Harris earned her BA from Greensboro College and an MA from UNC Chapel Hill. 

Anna Helgeson is an artist, curator, writer, and educator living in the mountains of North Carolina. Helgeson received a BA  from  Ripon  College  and  a  MFA  (Cum  Laude)  from  the  University  of  Wisconsin,  Milwaukee. She teaches performance art  at  Warren  Wilson  College.   

Andrea Heiss  is the director of the Arts-in-Depth Program at the Missouri School of Journalism and teaches cultural reporting in the magazine journalism area of study. Heiss earned her doctorate in American Studies at the University of Iowa, her master’s degree at Purdue University, and her bachelor’s degree, Phi Beta Kappa, from Illinois College. 

Scarlett Higgins teaches classes in contemporary American literature and film. She has published articles in The Langston Hughes Review, The Review of Contemporary Fiction, and Arizona Quarterly.  

Matthew Hofer teaches twentieth-century poetry and poetics at the University of New Mexico. His research focuses primarily on formally experimental work. He is the founder and editor of the series Recencies: Research and Recovery in Twentieth-Century American Poetics.

Hilary Holladay is a poet, novelist and scholar of modern and contemporary American poetry. She is a graduate of the University of Virginia with an M.A. from the College of William and Mary and a Ph.D. in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Elliot Inman has led workshops in electronics and creative coding on topics ranging from basic electronics and  Arduino  programming to Fast Fourier Analysis. He earned his undergraduate degree in English at North Carolina State University and his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at the University of Kentucky.

Michael Kellner  is an artist who lives in Columbus, Ohio and lectures in the Department of Design at the Ohio State University. Kellner received a BFA with a concentration in drawing from the Hite Art Institute at the University of Louisville; an MFA at the School of Art in the DAAP college at University of Cincinnati; and his Ph.D. from the Graduate School at The Ohio State University in Art Education.  

Steven Lane  is an artist and educator who lives in New York. He studied at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture and received a BFA from Antioch College; an MFA from the City College of New York; and an EdD from Columbia University, Teachers College. He is chair of the Department of Art at Keio Academy of New York, an affiliate of Keio University, Japan.

Dianne Loftis is an artist, writer and cultural worker focused on the study and practice of socially-engaged art. She has collaborated on the curation and production of public art projects and forums as well as several small publications. Her art practice investigates notions of spatial justice and the relationships between people and place. 

Corey Loftus is a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania where she studied Art History and Religious Studies. Her research interests include Twentieth-Century American Art and Modern Irish History. Loftus is currently partnered with the West Philadelphia Historical Society to research local buildings and to prepare the necessary nomination materials for their historic preservation. 

Paige  Lunde  is a Ph.D. candidate currently completing her dissertation in the Philosophy of Art Theory and Aesthetics at The Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts (IDSVA). She is also an Artist, Art Educator, and Arts Advocate living in the Chicago area. 

Katherine Markoski  is the Director of the Kohl Gallery and Lecturer in Art History at Washington College. She  received her Ph.D. in the History of Art from Johns Hopkins  University, having completed  a  dissertation on Black Mountain College. Markoski is a  recipient of the  Dedalus  Foundation  Dissertation Fellowship and a Smithsonian American Art Museum Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Caroline McAlister has a  Ph.D. in English Literature from Emory University and is pursuing an MFA in writing books for children from Hollins University. She teaches writing at Guilford College and has published three children’s picture books. Her picture book about the life of BMC sculptor, Ruth  Asawa, is forthcoming from Roaring Brook/Macmillan in 2020 or 2021.

Jay Miller is a philosophy professor at Warren Wilson College, specializing in the philosophy of art, politics, and aesthetics. Miller received a BA at the College of William and Mary and a Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame where he did his dissertation on the intersection of G.W.F. Hegel’s aesthetics and social/political philosophy. 

Dr. Ray Miller, Professor in Dance Studies and Theatre Arts at Appalachian State University, has directed and choreographed over 150 productions. Miller served as President for the Congress on Research in Dance. He has published in  Theatre Journal, Dance Research Journal, Theatre Topics,  Studies in Musical  Theatre, Journal on Dance Education, and others.  

Eric Mullis is a Charlotte, NC-based dance artist who received an MFA in Dance from the University of Wisconsin (Milwaukee) and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of South Carolina. His current research interests include ecstatic states in charismatic Appalachian Pentecostalism and improvisation across artistic disciplines. 

 
Tom Murphy is a People’s Poetry Festival-Corpus Christi Committee member. Murphy’s books & CDs include: American History (Slough Press, 2017), co-edited Stone Renga (Tail Feather, 2017), chapbook Horizon to Horizon (Strike Syndicate, 2015), CD “Live from Del Mar College (BOW Productions, 2015), and CD “Slams from the Pit” (BOW Productions, 2014). Murphy has previously presented at ReVIEWING BMC 1-5. He teaches at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. 

Savannah Paige Murray is a Ph.D. student in Rhetoric & Writing at Virginia Tech.  Murray  was a contributor and member of the editorial staff for  Appalachian Journal’s special edition on Black Mountain College.

OKAPI is an Asheville-based duo  that  utilizes  double bass, cello, and voice through unconventional juxtapositions to create an  alternative sense of unity within their intimate orchestrations. Carrying  honest and satirical  messages driven by existential  philosophies, their work  forms a unique  mosaic which  aims  to stimulate the cryptic emotions often overlooked in everyday life, in  hopes of inspiring universal consciousness and individual empowerment. 

David  Peifer has taught mathematics at UNC Asheville for  24 years. He does research in topology and infinite group theory. Peifer has published papers on the mathematics and history of Max  Dehn, a German mathematician who became a BMC faculty member. David has been a board member of the BMCM+AC for the past nine years.

Dr. Joseph Pizza received his doctorate in English Language and Literature from Oxford University in 2012. He has since taught courses in Modern and Contemporary Literature and in African American and Africana Studies for Johnson C. Smith University and Belmont Abbey College in nearby Charlotte, NC.  

Ted Pope is a performance poet, included in multiple collections of poetry, including  Varve.

Dylan Powell is a senior from Sampson County, NC, and a Political Science/Public Administration Major at Appalachian State University.

Dr. Damiana Pyles is an Associate Professor of Media Studies and Curriculum and Instruction at Appalachian State University. Pyles has a background in both Literary and Literacy Studies, with particular emphasis on social semiotics in media production. She currently teaches courses to preservice and practicing teachers to help them develop critical media literacy perspectives. 

John Roche earned his Ph.D. from SUNY/Buffalo studying under Robert Creeley and Jack Clarke as well as an MA from University College Dublin, Ireland. Roche co-edited an anthology of poems from Auburn Prison, and edited Martha Rittenhouse Treichler’s Black Mountain to Crooked Lake: Poems 1948-2010, with a Memoir of Black Mountain College (2010). He was the chief organizer of the 2010 Black Mountain North Symposium in Rochester, NY.

Adam Rogers is an innovative, user-focused librarian who works at the intersection of public services and new technologies. In his role as Head of Making & Innovation Studio for the NCSU Libraries, he directs the library’s  Makerspace  program, which includes spaces at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library and the D.H. Hill Library, and makes 3D printing, 3D scanning, laser cutting, and electronics prototyping tools accessible to all at NC State.

David Romito is a science and  makerspace  librarian at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works with students, faculty, and staff in all disciplines, helping them enrich their research and learning experience with technologies such as 3D printing, electronics, and virtual reality.

 
Borim Song is Associate Professor at the School of Art and Design of East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA. She holds her Ed.D. and Ed.M. from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City. Song’s writings on art, art education, and cultural studies appear in publications in both the U.S. and Korea.
 
Heather South is the lead archivist at the Western Regional Archives. South works to help collect, preserve, and make historical and evidential materials relating to western North Carolina accessible to the public. 

Matthew Steinke is an American artist and composer working with robotics, sculpture, and animation. His sonic narratives and musical experiments take the form of audio recordings, videos, performances, and installations. Steinke’s invented instruments combine electromechanical engineering and acoustic design for both composed and improvised performances.  

Seth Stewart earned his Ph.D. at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he edited the journals and letters of John Wieners. He edited and published Stars Seen in Person:  Selected Journals of John Wieners (2015, City Lights Books), which collects four of Wieners previously unpublished journals from the period between 1955 and 1969. 

Lee Lawson Stockdale has a wide range of experience including: NYC cab driver, Army Colonel, criminal defense attorney, Library of Congress Junior Fellow, and Poetry Craft Workshop Instructor at Isothermal Community College, Columbus, NC. He received his  MFA in  Creative Writing from Queens University, Charlotte, NC.

Eriko Takeno is an artist at Royal College of Art (London, UK), School of Communication, Information Experience Design. Her research focuses on the quality of art education in relation to mental health which she examines in a variety of media including the use of moving image within a space, installation, contextual design, and artistic multimodal research method. She has led workshops in artistic multimodal research method in Japan.

 
Mabel Taylor  is a recent graduate of Barnard College, where she earned a degree in American Studies. Her senior thesis, entitled “Between Alchemy and Daily Bread: M.C. Richards After Black Mountain”  explores the life and legacy of M.C. Richards through  close study of  three books that Richards either wrote, planned to write, or translated. 

Julie J. Thomson is an independent scholar, curator, and the editor of That Was The Answer: Interviews with Ray Johnson (2018). In 2017, Thomson curated the exhibition Begin To See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College at the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center. 

Grace Villamil is a multidisciplinary artist exploring interconnectivity through installation, video and sound. Her mylar multi-sensory environments are places where hope, curiosity and reflection coexist and are implanted with visitors to share in their individual worlds.

Molly Warnock is an assistant professor in History of Art at Johns Hopkins University where she specializes in twentieth and twenty-first century art and theory. Prior to joining the faculty of Johns Hopkins in 2013, she held a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at Princeton University (2008-10), an ACLS-Mellon New Faculty Fellowship at the University of Chicago (2010-12), and an assistant professorship at Emory University (2012-13).

Benjamin Todd Wills is the Catron Visiting Professor of Art at Washburn University. He received his Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa. Wills served as Instructor of Record at the University of Iowa from 2014-2017. His work has been exhibited across the United States. 

Thomas Young is an artist, student, and aspiring teacher based in Boone and Asheville. Their research is focused on Gertrude Stein, queerness, modernism, and the body in the LGBTQ+ community. Young discovered Black Mountain College while growing up in Asheville, reading Olson, performing Cage, and appreciating de Kooning, but, ultimately, falling in love with the writing of Francine du Plessix Gray and M.C. Richards. 

Erika Archer Zarow is the daughter of BMC artist/photographer Hazel-Frieda Larsen Archer. From an early age, Zarow participated in her mother’s classes in Perception at the Tucson Art Center. She is the head of the Estate of Hazel Larsen Archer.

Julie J. Thomson is an independent scholar, curator, and the editor of That Was The Answer: Interviews with Ray Johnson (2018). In 2017, Thomson curated the exhibition Begin To See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College at the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center. 

Grace Villamil is a multidisciplinary artist exploring interconnectivity through installation, video and sound. Her mylar multi-sensory environments are places where hope, curiosity and reflection coexist and are implanted with visitors to share in their individual worlds.

Molly Warnock is an assistant professor in History of Art at Johns Hopkins University where she specializes in twentieth and twenty-first century art and theory. Prior to joining the faculty of Johns Hopkins in 2013, she held a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at Princeton University (2008-10), an ACLS-Mellon New Faculty Fellowship at the University of Chicago (2010-12), and an assistant professorship at Emory University (2012-13).

Benjamin Todd Wills is the Catron Visiting Professor of Art at Washburn University. He received his Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa. Wills served as Instructor of Record at the University of Iowa from 2014-2017. His work has been exhibited across the United States. 

Thomas Young is an artist, student, and aspiring teacher based in Boone and Asheville. Their research is focused on Gertrude Stein, queerness, modernism, and the body in the LGBTQ+ community. Young discovered Black Mountain College while growing up in Asheville, reading Olson, performing Cage, and appreciating de Kooning, but, ultimately, falling in love with the writing of Francine du Plessix Gray and M.C. Richards. 

Erika Archer Zarow is the daughter of BMC artist/photographer Hazel-Frieda Larsen Archer. From an early age, Zarow participated in her mother’s classes in Perception at the Tucson Art Center. She is the head of the Estate of Hazel Larsen Archer.